Action for the Climate Emergency (c3) Climate Emergency Advocates (c4)

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Organization Name Action for the Climate Emergency (c3) Climate Emergency Advocates (c4)
Initial Tier Ranking 1
Priority Tier 1
Total Budget Gap $1,785,000
c3 Voter Registration Gap $1,785,000
c4 Voter Registration Gap
PAC Voter Registration Gap
Date of Submission 12/19/2023 14:35:33, 12/19/2023 14:35:33
Program Summary Registering young people by tabling in high-traffic areas (campuses, concerts, community centers etc.), phones, texts and doors, and through cost-effective digital engagement
Program States PA, WI, GA, NV, NC, OH, AZ
Program States old Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia, Nevada, North Carolina, Ohio, Arizona
Cost per VR card ACE and CEA field voter registration delivers the gold standard of voter registrations. During this year’s pilot paid canvass programs, our average dollar per completed voter registration card varied depending on the salience of the election and the tactics of the canvass (e.g. urban vs. suburban/exurban geographic focus) at $60-90/card. As such, we anticipate aiming for a field cost per registration card of $75 in these Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Wisconsin programs.

With a standard digital voter registration conversion rate of 20%—we anticipate a $100 per digital voter registration based on our 2022 midterm performance and digital voter engagement budgets. This accounts for the increased cost of geo-targeted strategies—the narrower the scope of our campaign, the more expensive its paid ad budget. However, this allows for an extremely impactful reach and targeting approach, ensuring eligible voters in key electorates are reached in high frequencies.

Our VR goals (paid field canvass, P2P SMS & digital) for 2024 in the target geographies are as follows:
Pennsylvania: 20,000
Wisconsin: 5,000
Georgia: 10,000
Nevada: 1,260 “ACE and CEA field voter registration delivers the gold standard of voter registrations. During this summer’s paid field canvass in North Carolina, we registered 455 new diverse voters with a budget of just $28,000—at $60 per completed VR card. However, we ran this pilot program as an extremely lean operation without dedicated resources for leadership staff time—our current Wisconsin paid field canvass is closer to $90/card. As such, we anticipate aiming for a field cost per registration card of $75 in these Ohio and North Carolina programs.

With a standard digital voter registration conversion rate of 20%—we anticipate a $100 per digital voter registration based on our 2022 midterm performance and digital voter engagement budgets. This accounts for the increased cost of geo-targeted strategies—the narrower the scope of our campaign, the more expensive its paid ad budget. However, this allows for an extremely impactful reach and targeting approach, ensuring eligible voters in key electorates are reached in high frequencies.

Our VR goals (paid field canvass & digital) for 2024 in the target geographies are as follows:
North Carolina:
– Statewide VR Goal: 6,666
— Mecklenburg: 3,333
— Gaston: 666
— Cabarrus: 666
— Guilford: 2,000

Ohio: Cuyahoga County VR Goal: 6,666

Arizona: 3,000”

Reported Cost per VR Card $75 – $100
Cost-card believability
CaPA Notes on Reported Cost per Card Detailed breakdown of costs and they have expensive experience. It seems like they are including overhead in their overall program budget but not 100% certain.
Estimated Cost per VR Card $75
Adjustment made for cost-card
RYVF Overlay Youth, Rural, BIPOC
RYVF Score 3
Pooled Grant Givers Movement Voter Project, Rural Democracy Initiative, America Votes, State Voices
Organization’s Legal Status
2022 or 2023 Expenses
2024 Budgets
Organization Mission Statement Action for the Climate Emergency (ACE) has a mission to educate, inspire, and support young people to lead the fight for their future. We ensure they have everything they need to understand the science and advocate for solutions to the climate emergency. We achieve our mission by reaching tens of millions of young people with our programs each year, training a new generation of leaders, amplifying youth voices to shift the narrative, and increasing diverse youth participation in our democracy.

Climate Emergency Advocates (CEA) was founded in 2021 as the 501(c)(4) affiliate of Action for the Climate Emergency (ACE) to mobilize millions of young people to support climate and clean energy leadership, and to accelerate the end of the fossil fuel era and the deployment of renewable energy.

Together, CEA and ACE are one of the longest-running youth-serving organizations in the U.S. working at the nexus of youth, climate, and democracy. We have a collective 15-year track record of building the youth climate movement, mobilizing youth inside and outside of the movement to take millions of strategic climate actions, training thousands of young leaders in communities across the country, and reaching tens of millions of voters each cycle. We see a critical role to play in re-galvanizing the youth movement in 2024, training a new generation of thousands of climate and civic engagement campaigners, and unleashing them in the lead-up to the 2024 race where youth are poised to make up 40% of the electorate.

Organization Leadership BIPOC-led, Women-led
Lead Contact Name Tessa Mellin
Lead Contact Title Assistant Director of Institutional Philanthropy
Lead Contact Email tessa@acespace.org
Lead Contact Phone 617-642-0040
Email Address-other
Lead Contact Pronouns She/Her
Core Constituencies engaged in VR program Multi-racial (including white), BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and/or People Of Color), Youth and Students (aged 15-35)
Issue Focus We focus on organizing youth around issues pertaining to the climate emergency. Central to our voter engagement approach is ongoing, consistent civic organizing and engagement with young people in order to ensure the highest impact on registration and turnout during both national and local election cycles. Our state-based field canvass operations leverage evolving talking point strategies that shift from a voter registration focus to turnout and then onto broader election awareness education. For example, our paid canvass voter registration program in Wisconsin this spring was focused on registering new young voters and turning them out for the state Supreme Court race—canvassers included educational messaging about why civic engagement in down-ballot, off-cycle elections is important. We then convert our voter registration operations into voter turnout messaging. At the same time, our digital voter engagement strategies use creative marketing tactics to drive conversions—leveraging issue organizing and online trends to attract folks who are not easily engaged through basic voter registration messaging. At ACE, we also know that the environment and climate change are top issues driving young people to the polls. As such, our year-round youth organizing and power-building focuses on engaging young people in climate action opportunities that build this civic muscle. In fact, this fall ACE ran a pre-2024 Election Youth Survey with our research partners at CIRCLE at Tufts University to poll eligible youth voters, revealing key findings that include: The youth vote has the potential to be a powerful force in 2024: 57 percent of youth polled expressed that they are “extremely likely” to vote in 2024 and another 16 percent say they are “fairly likely,”—meaning 2024 could elicit the highest youth voter turnout in recent history. Concern for climate drives voting: Climate was identified as a top three voting issue among youth—and those who selected climate as a top issue were 20 points more likely to say they’ll vote in 2024. Engaging our nation’s youngest citizens is critical for building lifelong voting habits: We know from prior research that voting is a “sticky habit,” and this poll underscores that finding—with 86 percent of young people who voted in 2022 reporting that they are “extremely likely” to vote again in 2024. Many youth—particularly marginalized youth—feel unprepared to vote: Less than 1 in 5 young people have heard about politics and issues this year from organizations like ACE (14 percent). Black youth, young People of Color in rural communities, and young people without a college degree are receiving even less information—and simultaneously report that they are less likely to vote. This year our key issue advocacy areas of focus for this work include: stopping new fossil fuel industry expansion (particularly in the Midwest, Ohio River Valley, and Gulf South); softening the ground for clean energy permitting locally to seize siting opportunities via federal climate investments like the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA); accelerating IRA implementation and popularizing its benefits with consumers; and putting pressure on elected officials to advance policies and regulations that protect the environment and surrounding communities including fracking regulatory reforms in Pennsylvania. Further, fossil fuel corporations are currently outspending the clean energy sector 13 to 1 in political contributions. It’s clear the fossil fuel lobby has a stranglehold on U.S. politics and is successfully manipulating our political system to its benefit. However, we also know that an achievable increase of just a few percentage points in youth turnout in local elections can have a major impact on state Supreme Courts, City Councils, County Commissioners, Port Commission seats, and Public Utility Commission elections—all of which have the power to decide the fate of fossil fuel and renewable energy projects. ACE mobilizes young voters around these local, down-ballot elections—so far this year, we registered and turned out young voters in the lead-up to key local races in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, and educated our network in Ohio on the Issue 1 special election that had a pivotal impact on democracy in the state. Both ACE and CEA focus on organizing youth around issues pertaining to the climate emergency. Central to our voter engagement approach is ongoing, consistent civic organizing and engagement with young people in order to ensure the highest impact on registration and turnout during both national and local election cycles. Our key state-based field canvass operations leverage evolving talking point strategies that shift from a voter registration focus to turn out and then onto broader election awareness education. For example, while our recent paid canvass voter registration program in North Carolina was principally focused on registering new young voters of color and building excitement for the 2024 election—if a voter was registering in a Charlotte district, canvassers shifted to education about the upcoming local Charlotte City Council races and why civic engagement in down-ballot, off-cycle elections was important. At the same time, our digital voter engagement strategies use creative marketing tactics to drive conversions—leveraging issue organizing and online trends to attract folks who are not easily converted through basic voter registration messaging. At ACE, we also know that the environment and climate change are top issues driving young people to the polls. As such, our year-round youth organizing and power-building focuses on engaging young people in climate action opportunities that build this civic muscle. This year our key issue advocacy areas of focus for this work include: stopping new fossil fuel industry expansion (particularly in the Midwest, Ohio River Valley, and Gulf South); softening the ground for clean energy permitting locally to seize siting opportunities via federal climate investments like the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA); accelerating IRA implementation and popularizing its benefits with consumers; advancing 100% renewable energy state-based agendas; and holding utilities like Southwest Energy, Duke Energy, NW Naturals, and Arizona Public Services accountable. Further, fossil fuel corporations are currently outspending the clean energy sector 13 to 1 in political contributions. It’s clear the fossil fuel lobby has a stranglehold on U.S. politics and is successfully manipulating our political system to its benefit. However, we also know that an achievable increase of just a few percentage points in youth turnout in local elections can have a major impact on state Supreme Courts, City Councils, County Commissioners, Port Commission seats, and Public Utility Commission elections—all of which have the power to decide the fate of fossil fuel and renewable energy projects. ACE mobilizes young voters around these critical local, down-ballot elections—so far this year, we registered and turned out young voters in the lead-up to key local races in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, the Wisconsin Supreme Court race, and educated our network in Ohio on the Issue 1 special election that had a pivotal impact on democracy in the state.
Tactics for collecting voter registration cards We first piloted and tested our civic engagement programs in 2018. Since then, we have reached millions of youth voters with the tools and information they need to cast their ballots—registering over 100,000 incremental youth voters in 2020 and again in the 2022 midterms and reaching 36 million with digital campaigns combatting election disinformation and connecting young people to local resources to turn out to vote. Through our c3 arm, ACE, we use a combination of field and digital organizing tactics to engage, educate, and mobilize youth voters to turn out in down-ballot races and local elections, having an immediate impact while building power and momentum in the lead-up to the 2024 election cycle. We then build on this work via our c4 arm, CEA, to convert youth civic power into meaningful climate and clean energy wins. CEA strategically supports progressive political campaigns to elect climate and clean energy champions. We employ a rich diversity of tactics to engage millions of voters through layered modes of contact including digital ads, youth social media content, creator marketing, field-based contact (e.g. high-traffic, community-based canvassing, in-school outreach, etc.), phone banking, text banking, and targeted mail outreach: Field-based Voter Contact: ACE and CEA engage dozens of leaders through youth-led organizing Action Teams in communities in our key field states including Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Georgia. Paid field canvass teams—largely recruited from Action Team members—work with field staff to run site-based voter registration collection at their local high schools and mobilize peers, friends, and family to participate in local, state, and national elections. Newly this year, we are seeking to launch a Field Fellows program on college campuses, including under-reached community colleges and HBCUs, to train students to register and turnout peers to vote while building towards careers in the civic engagement field. ACE’s field and remote canvassers educate youth about their civic power, and turn out and register diverse young people via door-to-door tactics and high-traffic community tabling in youth-focused public spaces—including community centers, college, and university campuses, and at local events like concerts, festivals, street fairs, markets, etc—as well as text and phone banking. ACE field canvassing teams are actively present and engaging people in these youth-focused community spaces, supporting young people in registering to vote and educating them about local and national elections and how to exercise their civic power—prioritizing neighborhoods of color. These field canvass teams are recruited from our membership—supporting an integrated voter engagement strategy that builds young people’s civic leadership capacity and targets disenfranchised youth for registration. Digital Tactics: We are a national leader in the communications, marketing, and new media space. We leverage our expertise to run a sophisticated set of organic youth creator and paid media campaigns for voter education, registration, and turnout, as well as disinformation inoculation. We leverage our digital media expertise and our scalable geo-targeted ad reach to register and turn out voters, as well as to provide a counterforce to the powerful wave of disinformation regarding the climate emergency and democratic participation, which serves as a barrier to participation for youth. Protecting Voting Rights and Ensuring Fair Redistricting: We believe and recognize that fiercely protecting and expanding voting rights for youth and communities of color is vital to building power among people who have been historically and repeatedly disenfranchised within democratic systems. While critical, it is not enough to simply mobilize those who are eligible to vote; we recognize that we must also fight to democratize the systems and infrastructure that we’re working within in order to build long-term power and advance swift and meaningful climate action. ACE and CEA work to mobilize youth to fight proposals to restrict voting rights in our key states. (Current key states with on-the-ground field presence: Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Louisiana, and Georgia. Expansion states without a current field presence, but a massive digital footprint include: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, and Nevada.) Further, we leverage innovative, youth-led messaging and the power of peer-to-peer storytelling to engage young people—with a focus on young people in rural and agricultural communities, and BIPOC youth. An independent study verified that of the voters we registered in the last presidential election, 83 percent were BIPOC—with 38 percent identifying as Black, 34 percent Latinx, and 11 percent Asian. The specific strategies that we utilize differ in each state based on the political landscape, whether we have a field presence there, and the availability of c3/c4 funding. For example, in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, we utilize robust c3 and c4 field and digital tactics, whereas in Nevada, we prioritize targeted c3 field and direct voter contact, engaging young people at school through our Our Climate Our Future presentations. Georgia is a new growth state for ACE, as we recently received seed funding from Vote Your Voice to scale our voter engagement work there. We aim to leverage this support to build our new Atlanta-based field team while continuing to utilize digital programming to engage young people across the state. Broadly, our CEA c4 voter engagement model will contribute toward ACE’s VR budget and goals as c4 registrations for pro-climate candidates in target races we have identified. ACE and CEA are poised to dramatically scale our voter registration efforts in these states in the lead-up to the 2024 elections. Notably, we’ve been running a series of paid field canvass voter engagement pilot programs in target states including in Pennsylvania where we registered more than 3,000 diverse new voters in the greater Philadelphia area and suburb and exurb communities in the collar counties in 2023. These pilots have been instrumental in preparing ACE and CEA for the 2024 election cycle, as we have been able to refine our voter engagement strategies and tactics while also gaining valuable knowledge about the changing electorates on the ground. We look forward to incorporating these learnings as we scale our programs in the months ahead.
Geographic Focus Rural, Suburban / Ex-urban, Small city (<100k), Urban - Large city (>100k), ACE and CEA work statewide in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Nevada. We focus on engaging young people in communities most impacted by climate change, severe weather events, energy burdens, and fossil fuel infrastructure, and prioritize outreach to BIPOC youth, as well as young people in rural and agricultural communities. ACE and CEA fill two important gaps in coalition-based voter registration efforts with our field experience running paid canvass in less densely populated suburbs and exurbs, as well as broad-reaching and highly cost-effective digital voter engagement tactics demonstrating high VR conversion rates—our standard voter registration funnel has resulted in a 20% conversion (i.e. 20% of those who land on the online voter registration page click the submit button).
Jurisdictional Focus While we work statewide across Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Nevada, via digital tactics, we have a particular field and remote P2P SMS focus in: Milwaukee county in Wisconsin Fulton, Cobb, Dekalb, Gwinnett, and Richmond counties in Georgia Montgomery, Bucks, Allegheny, Erie, and Delaware counties in Pennsylvania Clark and Washoe counties in Nevada We are also able to deploy geo-targeted paid digital strategies to key zip codes and designated market areas (DMAs) as needed based on electoral significance and c3/c4 strategies. While we work statewide across North Carolina, Ohio, and Arizona, via digital tactics, we have a particular field focus on the greater Cleveland area in Ohio and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area in North Carolina. In the 2024 cycle, we also plan to scale our field voter registration programs (dependent on funding) in North Carolina to include Gaston, Cabarrus, and Guilford Counties. We are also able to deploy geo-targeted paid digital strategies to key zip codes and designated market areas (DMAs) as needed based on electoral significance and c3/c4 strategies.
Program Budgets ACE:
Pennsylvania: paid field canvass, P2P SMS & digital
– Montgomery: $125,000
– Bucks: $125,000
– Allegheny: $500,000
– Erie: $125,000
– Delaware: $125,000
– Statewide: $525,000

Georgia: paid field canvass, P2P SMS & digital
– Cobb: $100,000
– Dekalb: $100,000
– Fulton: $350,000
– Gwinnett: $50,000
– Richmond: $200,000
– Statewide: $475,000

Wisconsin: paid field canvass, P2P SMS & digital
– Milwaukee County: $270,000
– Statewide: $200,000

Nevada: P2P SMS & digital
– Clark: $22,250
– Washoe: $22,250
– Statewide: 50,000

CEA:
Pennsylvania: a portion of the ACE budget based on available c4 funding secured for paid field canvass, P2P SMS & digital
– Montgomery: $125,000
– Bucks: $125,000
– Allegheny: $500,000
– Erie: $125,000
– Delaware: $125,000
– Statewide: $525,000

Georgia: a portion of the ACE budget based on available c4 funding secured for paid field canvass, P2P SMS & digital
– Cobb: $100,000
– Dekalb: $100,000
– Fulton: $350,000
– Gwinnett: $50,000
– Richmond: $200,000
– Statewide: $475,000

Wisconsin: a portion of the ACE budget based on available c4 funding secured for paid field canvass, P2P SMS & digital
– Milwaukee County: $270,000
– Statewide: $200,000

Nevada: a portion of the ACE budget based on available c4 funding secured for P2P SMS & digital
– Clark: $22,250
– Washoe: $22,250
– Statewide: 50,000

Total PA Statewide:
ACE: $1,525,000
CEA: portion of the above ACE budget

Total GA Statewide:
ACE: $1,275,000
CEA: portion of the above ACE budget

Total WI Statewide:
ACE: $470,000
CEA: portion of the above ACE budget

Total NV Statewide:
ACE: $94,500
CEA: portion of the above ACE budget
“ACE:
North Carolina:
Mecklenburg: $250,000 paid field canvass & digital
Gaston: $50,000 paid field canvass & digital
Cabarrus: $50,000 paid field canvass & digital
Guilford: $150,000 paid field canvass & digital

Ohio:
Cuyahoga: $500,000 paid field canvass & digital

Arizona:
Statewide: $300,000 digital

CEA:
North Carolina: a portion of the ACE budget based on available c4 funding secured
Mecklenburg: $250,000 paid field canvass & digital
Gaston: $50,000 paid field canvass & digital
Cabarrus: $50,000 paid field canvass & digital
Guilford: $150,000 paid field canvass & digital

Ohio: a portion of the ACE budget based on available c4 funding secured
Cuyahoga: $500,000 paid field canvass & digital

Arizona: a portion of the ACE budget based on available c4 funding secured
Statewide: $300,000 digital

Total OH Statewide:
ACE: $500,000
CEA: portion of the above ACE budget

Total NC Statewide:
ACE: $500,000
CEA: portion of the above ACE budget

Total AZ Statewide:
ACE: $300,000
CEA: portion of the above ACE budget”

Budget gaps ACE Gaps: Pennsylvania: $525,000 Georgia: $925,000 Wisconsin: $245,000 Nevada: $90,000 CEA Gaps: Pennsylvania: a portion of the above ACE gap Georgia: a portion of the above ACE gap Wisconsin: a portion of the above ACE gap Nevada: a portion of the above ACE gap. ACE Gaps: North Carolina: $500,000 Ohio: $450,000 Arizona: $250,000 CEA Gaps: North Carolina: a portion of the above ACE gap Ohio: a portion of the above ACE gap Arizona: a portion of the above ACE gap
Partnerships We work in partnership with coalitions locally to identify key targets, protect and expand voting rights, ensure fair redistricting, register and turn out new voters, and build the power and momentum of the youth climate vote. Key civic engagement partners in the target states include PA Voice, Keystone Votes Coalitions, State Voices WI Civic Engagement table, Silver State Voices, Everybody Votes Campaign, Movement Voter Project, and America Votes. Additionally, ACE coordinates climate and civic actions with local partners including Clean Economy Coalition of WI, PennFuture, Women for a Healthy Environment, One PA, Breathe Project, Beaver County Marcellus Awareness Community, Reflo, Teens Grow Greens, Cream City Conservation Corps, Building Unity, YES (Youth Empowered in the Struggle), People Over Petro Coalition, and more. We work in partnership with coalitions locally to identify key targets, protect and expand voting rights, ensure fair redistricting, register and turn out new voters, and build the power and momentum of the youth climate vote. Key partners in the target states include Blueprint NC, Ohio Climate and Clean Energy Coalition, Everybody Votes Campaign, and America Votes.
Follow up call requested?
Notes
Follow up questions
Question Sent Date
Question Response
Response Date CEA Gaps: Pennsylvania: a portion of the above ACE gap Georgia: a portion of the above ACE gap Wisconsin: a portion of the above ACE gap Nevada: a portion of the above ACE gap. CEA Gaps: North Carolina: a portion of the above ACE gap Ohio: a portion of the above ACE gap Arizona: a portion of the above ACE gap
Org Type 1 2.5
Org Size 1 2.5
Program Impact 1 1
Program Efficiency 1 3
Leadership & engagement 1
Ideological Targeting 1 1
Creative 1 2
Impact of previous Voter Registration programs
How many voter registration cards does your organization plan to collect in 2024
RDI c3 Awards $50,000 for WI work
RDI c4 Awards (as of 2/28)
After AQ first2
last 2 confidential